6 months as a blog with Docs.com

docscomblog6mnthsIn May 2016, I started a trial using Docs.com as my blogging platform. Powered by Sway, it is easy to present the content, knowing that it will adapt to any screen size. I like to create blog posts with a combination of online content and videos. Sway does a great job arranging this for me. It has expanded it’s list of supported sources which continues to give further options for creators to exhibit and share their work. Teamed with the close proximity to document and link collections, Docs.com has a lot of potential to be a great blogging platform.

There are a few things missing though which are roadblocks for this to become a real contender for posting here permanently.

While the posts are exposed to search engines for indexing, they are not optimized in a way that improves your standing in the order of search results. Search for “blogging from docs.com” and you’ll see my post. But only because I posted it on thisĀ WordPress site and I recorded a YouTube video about the potential of Docs.com being a blogging platform. This means that my blog content isn’t being found by my wider audience. They will only hear about it if they come across my social media posts and not from search results.

Another important feature of blogs is the comment platform. Discussion, questions and feedback give more value to the post. Docs.com uses Disqus, just as I do on my WordPress site. However, the version of Disqus that Docs.com uses is a closed one. As long as the Docs.com user is logged in, the identity is used and comments can be added. OR, if a visitor is logged into Disqus with their account, they can make comments with that account. That makes sense. What doesn’t make sense is that the owner of the Docs.com account can’t use their public Disqus account to manage comments or reply. They use a closed Disqus account that is associated with their Docs.com identity. It negates the value of public Disqus, where you can manage your comments from your blogs and all the other places you have used Disqus to converse.

I’m also missing the rich analytics I get from Google Analytics integration with WordPress. I learn more about my audience and can target shape my blog posts, scheduling them to be posted during optimal times when they read. Docs.com offers basic statistics in a view count and a bar graph on when the views occurred. It can show some basic info on the sources visitors came from. But that’s it.

I’m going to step away from Docs.com as a blogging platform. I enjoyed the ease of content creation. But these core requirements for a blog site need to be fulfilled before Docs.com can fit my needs. I’ll continue to use Docs.com to publish presentations and Sways, and I’ll keep watching for more developments in the future.